Username Post: Consignment Shops        (Topic#1573547)
Mercy4Free
Diva
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Joined: 01-11-04
Mercy4Free

I am thinking of bringing some clothes to a consignment shop. Any tips? How does it work?


 
ScrappyMama6
Mayor
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Joined: 06-28-10
ScrappyMama6
In response to Mercy4Free

Most have a certain % split, you get 40% of selling price, they keep the other 60%, or 50/50...whatever.

It has to be current style, in like new condition, no holes, stains, rips etc....current season (no winter coats NOW etc....). Some prefer you call ahead, and they make appts to go thru your stuff with you there, others let you drop off early in the week, they go thru and return the rest to you if they feel they cant sell it for whatever reason.

They assign a $$ value to it that will sell (or should sell), and your contract is usually 60-90 days with a check made out at the end or some may let you use the $ you make as store credit.

Id call a few and look at them FIRST, before you schlep all your stuff in there, then decide its outdated, or dirty or whatever.

Most do not take cribs, carseats etc....anything that makes them liable in case of an accident. Ask for a list of no-nos and save yourself trouble.

Good luck. I do it, and rarely spend any 'real' money on stuff for me or the kids, and sometimes actually make a little to take home!


 
PokeyMom
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Joined: 06-01-06
PokeyMom
In response to Mercy4Free

A basic consignment shop requires your clothing should be in style, clean, pressed and no holes, odors (perfumes, perspiration, cigarette) or damage (stains (collar, underarms), missing buttons, rips, tears, cigarette holes, moth holes, etc) and usually on hangers. (You usually take your hangers back after they view.)

You usually make an appointment.

The shop will look over your clothing and decide what they will take and what they will not.
They have the right to refuse items (condition, not stylish, may not sell in their shop, etc)
They price them according to their shop standards.

Depending on the shop, the percentages are (what they keep/what you earn), 60/40, 70/30, or 50/50.

You will be given an account number (some shops charge a fee to register also).
Some use auto systems that keep tract of everything (computer) and make computerized tags, and some still do it by hand (all accounting and tag making) which means, many mistakes can happen.

Once your item sells, it is recorded.
Usually after a set amount of period, you can pick up your check, or they mail it to you.
Usually after a set amount of time (30 days, 45 days, and half price at 60 days), they discount your merchandise which lowers your profit.
Most shops do not offer info on your sold items until the time period is up.

Some shops also have a time limit which means you have to pick up any unsold item after a set amount of time OR they will donate it to a charity if not picked up.

Some things that may occur:

1. Items you bring in disappear so you will not make any money as most stores do not have a policy for lost or stolen goods.

2. Most shops have a no return policy of goods bought so you get paid.

3. Items you bring in may end up soiled or damaged by patrons trying them on.

4. Potential amount of profit when you first bring your item in is high but as time marches on, dwindles if items get marked down.

5. Some shops may offer instant cash for a lot of clothing and it is usually sold by the pound (around 70 cents per pound). You allow them to buy and that is the end of the transaction, get your cash and leave.

6. There are vintage consignment shops also but you have to check on the period of style they specialize in.

Check online to see if a shop near you has a site, usually things are all spelled out there on their policy page.

HTH



 
Lamoo12
Governor
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Joined: 08-06-07
Lamoo12
In response to PokeyMom

you'll probably make more money having a garage sale. that is what i noticed when i priced out consignment shops in our area.


 
PokeyMom
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Posts: 1894
Joined: 06-01-06
PokeyMom
In response to Lamoo12

That is true.

You need to think of your time going in, then collecting and your gas money to and from against the potential profit.

In my neighborhood, we have a Closet Sale where everyone cleans out their closets, cleans up their clothing, and we go over to one house and sell for a few hours. Naturally we advertise what sorts of items we have (labels), and sizes with a price range. Some take pictures and we add a slide show on our CL ad.

I would say, that we do make a bit more in a few hours than what we would get at the consignment shop over a 90 day period.

I have also gone to those Closet Clean Out parties where you trade your items for other's items.


 
Trina_P
Guru
Posts: 2510
Joined: 06-30-05
Trina_P
In response to PokeyMom

I have not had a yard sale in years since Consignment shops are so much easier of a route to get rid of clothes, shoes and accessories.

I would caution you to ask about how they handle leftover items. Some donate items not sold within a certain period of time after they have been marked down multiple times. Others will allow you to come pick up your items.

Also if you are to just leave the items and then they look thru them to see what is sellable, if you want your unsellables back, ask about that also.


 
NMlady
NMlady 
Governor
Posts: 17792
Joined: 05-18-07
NMlady
In response to Trina_P

When my daughter was little I was fortunate to have an awesome consignment store to shop at. They gave you credit for your things you brought in to use towards your purchases rather than cash. I was so sad when their family situations caused them to have to sell the store. The new owners were not picky at all about what they took in.


 
*jesse*
Idol
Posts: 3062
Joined: 09-25-05
*jesse*
In response to NMlady

If you have multiple stores in your area, you should definitely call each to see what their policies are; they can vary. For example, one store in my area followed the above guidelines pretty closely (in style, not damaged, etc) whereas another was much more restrictive in what they would take and how they would take it (no shoes or jewelry at all, all clothing must be on hangers that you provide).

I have taken a few things in for consignment; didn't make a lot of money but it was better than nothing and required almost no effort on my part. I'd do it again.


 
Veteran
Posts: 320
Joined: 08-13-11
In response to *jesse*

Good morning. I'm very excited to have stumbled on this thread.
God bless,
Regards Lorraine


 
Sonsie
Sonsie 
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Posts: 1518
Joined: 04-24-09
Sonsie
In response to Noelles mom

Sounds like a huge pain in the keester. Bring them in to goodwill and get a receipt and write it off on your taxes. I did that with a lot of my suits that I no longer needed after I retired. I probably wrote more off on my taxes than they could ever have fetched from a shop or a garage sale.


 
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