Username Post: Die-Cut / Embossing Machines        (Topic#1551205)
bwasek
bwasek 
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Joined: 01-18-11
bwasek

Hello,
I've been scrapbooking special occasions for 15 years now. I'm just starting to look into all the cool new ways to embellish the pages. Typically I just use all sorts of card stock, stickers, and pre-cut dies, nothing fancy. After looking at blogs, galleries, and forum I've decided it's time to improve my hobby. I'm looking to buy one of the many die-cut machines and would also like it to do embossing (even though I'm not sure I understand what that means). The suppliers’ websites are not very helpful at explaining the product. I'm unclear, with certain machine do you have to use a die you have and simply make a copy? Then with the circuit I keep hearing about the cartilages, does it not do anything without one? What about hooking it up to a computer and using their software? My main concern is spending loads of money on a machine that won't do much without spending even more money for the accessories. Also if you like variety using the same lettering style over and over would get old. Any advice/knowledge would be great. I tried reading other forums, but they were way over my head!

Thanks,
Brandi


Edited by bwasek on 01-18-11 08:38 AM. Reason for edit: No reason given.


 
MrsAnnieS
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MrsAnnieS
In response to bwasek

Welcome to SB.com! This is a great place full of lots of helpful people and some amazing ideas!

I have the Sizzix Big Shot and the Cricut expression. And I love them both! The Big Shot die cuts and embosses pretty much any brand of die/embossing folder.

There are two types of embossing, wet and dry. Wet embossing is done with a heat gun, embossing powder and embossing ink. There are a few different ways to wet, you can use your stamps and stamp with the ink and then pour the powder and heat with your heat tool, or you can press the ink directly to the item you are embossing.

Dry embossing is done with a machine that you run a folder through and it creates a raised textured pattern on your paper.

The sizzix dies are really great, there are some lovely dies and embossing folders out there.

I also love my cricut, I only have 5 carts for it and can create so much with just those. If you are looking to do titles mainly with it you can get a font cart and there are several options for fonts on each, all similar but still sligtly different. Then each cart I have gotten has had a font on it as well as tons of different shapes.

There is a computer program you can use with your cricut but I haven't found a need for it yet-but I have only had mine for a couple of months.

I started with my sizzix though and would have been just fine only using that, but DH got me my cricut for Christmas. I still use my big shot just as much as my cricut, if not more!


 
bwasek
bwasek 
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Joined: 01-18-11
bwasek
In response to MrsAnnieS

Just read about the SCAL (sure cuts a lot) is that compatible with circuit? is it a cart?


 
bwasek
bwasek 
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Joined: 01-18-11
bwasek
In response to MrsAnnieS

Thanks!

Are embossing folders similar to carts? About the same price?


 
traceyjean
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Joined: 11-25-08
traceyjean
In response to bwasek

Hey Brandi,
I'll try to answer the questions I can and leave the others to the experts. There are 2 basic types of die cutting machines - manual and electronic. Manual machines such as the BigShot need a die which cuts your paper to a specific size and shape. They can also be used to emboss (create a raised impression on one side of your cardstock). Electronic machines also cut your paper into various shapes. The difference is that you decide the size of the final product. Most machines, like the Cricut, use a cartridge which contains many images as opposed to a die which only cuts one image. This means that cartridges cost more than dies, but it also means that you would need many dies to equal what's available to you on a cartridge.

SCAL is compatible with the Cricut, however it does void your warranty if installed and used on the machine during the first year of ownership (if the Cricut is new). It was not created by the makers of the Cricut and is a third party software.

Embossing folders are in no way similar to carts (shortened form of cartridges). They are more like dies in that they only create one shape on your paper, but they don't cut out the shape. Think of them as a mini file folder with ridges on the inside. When you add paper inside and press down firmly the ridges get imprinted and now your paper has those same ridges too. Put a scrap piece of cardstock on a mousepad and draw a line with pen and flip it over. The raised line is the same effect you would get from an embossing folder.


 
bwasek
bwasek 
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Joined: 01-18-11
bwasek
In response to traceyjean

That was very helpful. About how much does a folder cost? Now if I can only pick which system to buy..............


 
Here Kitty
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Here Kitty
In response to bwasek

  • bwasek Said:
That was very helpful. About how much does a folder cost? Now if I can only pick which system to buy..............


folders are pretty cheap and if you have a store that takes coupons, you can get them even cheaper!
At my Hobby Lobby, if I pay full price, I get a Cuttlebug embossing folder for about $5.


Edited by Here Kitty on 01-18-11 08:38 PM. Reason for edit: No reason given.


 
sunrenay
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Joined: 07-30-10
sunrenay
In response to Here Kitty

I love my Big Shot! I've used a Cuttlebug at my LSS and don't feel it's as tough as my Big Shot but I like how it's quite a bit smaller.

I think that a Cricut is probably cheaper in the long run because it gives you more options. However, unless you buy the latestest and gretest model, it doesn't emboss. I don't have or want one but I just thougth I'd toss that out there for you.


 
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