Username Post: Acid-free confusion        (Topic#1585061)
mj2007 
New Kid On the Block
Posts: 2
Joined: 02-11-13

Hi I am new here and my baby is almost a year old. I am creating my first scrap book which is actually a baby book. I got the actual book as my baby shower gift and just started scrapping. I am finding this acid-free thing so confusing! I bought all papers and pens acid-free but I need some advice.

how do you make sure that embellis and momentos from everyday events doesn't damage rest of your acid free stuff? Or dont you use anything that is not deemed acid free?


 
mrsdriver5
Idol
Posts: 4833
Joined: 07-31-10
mrsdriver5
In response to mj2007

Welcome, MJ How fun to have a little one to scrap for and it will be so much easier if you start now. My baby is almost 37, so I'll have a harder time ever catching up :>)

Some people are very acid-free advocates and some of us aren't I have photos, post cards, etc. from the 1800s that have been left in boxes and assorted albums, tossed with old newspaper/magazine clippings, letters, etc. and they are still in great shape. I don't use things that I know might rust or draw bugs, and I put dried flowers either in a little bag or sealed between glass, but that's mainly because I know they'll fall apart.

All of the things in my didn't-know-anything-abou t-acid baby books from my four kids are still as good as when I put them in the books. My oldest is 44, so things have been in the baby books for a while!

I know there are acid testers and also a spray to acid-proof things. I'll let the no-acid people tell you about them, but for me, I figure my books will be tossed because of lack of space/interest by my survivors sooner than acid will cause them to be destroyed.~Judy





 
Henri Jean
Queen
Posts: 28786
Joined: 04-25-09
Henri Jean
In response to mrsdriver5

Judy is right. Some are really careful about acido-free (I'm on that list) and I have to be honest, I'm probably overly cautious.

I have files in my file drawers of old letters and other documents on non-acid free papers and they are a mess. So yellow and ugly and some are falling apart. Some papers faded out until they cannot be read.

But those aren't photographs, they are papers. I don't want my scrapbooks to go the same way so I put in the extra ounce of prevention.

Lots of tickets and things I copy onto acid-free lignen free paper I buy only at Office Depot. They don't have it at Staples in the brand I prefer and trust. At Staples they always tell me that all of their papers are acid free-lignen free but if it doesn't say it on there - I don't trust it.

Overseas we get a lot of ticket stubs on very thin paper like grocery store recipts are printed on and those always fade to nothing so I photo copy those.

If something is nice with a lot of color to it but I"m not sure if it is acid free, then I spray it.


 
mrsdriver5
Idol
Posts: 4833
Joined: 07-31-10
mrsdriver5
In response to Henri Jean

Henri, could you tell the OP what you spray it with? I know you've mentioned it in other posts.

I always wonder why some people have had things damaged through the years and some, like me, have had things stay in good condition. I've mostly lived in dry places, so that might well be a good part of it, although my mom and her family lived in Omaha, so most all of the 1800-stuff was stored there for many, many years.

I know receipts often fade, especially when left in sunlight. Hubby used to work in L.A. during the week and be so proud that he kept his gas receipts for me. By the time I got them after a week in the hot car/sunlight, they were blank pieces of paper. :>)

The only photos that have turned for me are from 1977-78, I think it is. I might be off a year or two, but everyone I know who has pix from that time now have orange-tinted pictures. These were the little square pictures that either Kodak or ...rats, old brain cells at work, but the other main brand that K-Mart used to carry and use for film developing. Whichever company, they must have found out their film or developing technique didn't work because luckily, the photo damage didn't cover too long of a span. ~Judy


 
scrapchica
Guru
Posts: 2518
Joined: 09-29-06
scrapchica
In response to mrsdriver5

HL makes a pH tester pen that you can use on things like greeting cards, etc to test and see how safe it is to glue on the page. I found it really helpful when wanting to include shower invites, etc. Not everyone has been a fan of this idea, but I will also laminate something at Kinkos and then glue it in (plane ticket stubs, baby feet stamps from hospital) and I haven't seen any fading which those are always doing! I'm super careful about my pictures. Always making sure the tape and the paper around them is acid free to prevent yellowing.


 
Henri Jean
Queen
Posts: 28786
Joined: 04-25-09
Henri Jean
In response to mrsdriver5

Sure - its Make it Acid Free by Krylon but I've only found it in scrapbook stores.

The papers I had that really turned and fell apart with old documents on typing paper. That just didn't hold up. There are old security and bank papers to that can barely be read. I think there are some stock certificates that didn't do too well either but in the south it is humid and they have been moved around a bit, plus with the heat.

Except for photos with the orange or yellow tinge you mentioned and a lot of fading, photos seemed to have held up pretty well - especially black and white.


 
Henri Jean
Queen
Posts: 28786
Joined: 04-25-09
Henri Jean
In response to Henri Jean

I've heard that laminating won't permanently preserve things. My small high school diploma was laminated and you cannot read the name on it it - that faded off and the diploma is brownish yellow but the laminating is still perfect.

Maybe the laminating system is better now but I've heard that laminating didn't necessarily last. How long have you kept things that way? If it works I would try it. I have a laminating machine.


 
scrapchica
Guru
Posts: 2518
Joined: 09-29-06
scrapchica
In response to Henri Jean

I wondered about the new laminating machines (Xyron) myself but since I don't do it that much, I just pay for it at Kinkos. I have some newspaper articles that are 10ish years old and are still good. The "oldest, most volatile" thing I can think of is my plane ticket stubs that are 6.5 years old. The ink on those fades so fast. They look like the day they were printed on the laminated. But, a couple of them did get that black edging from the heat on the sensitive paper.


 
aquabunny
Idol
Posts: 3904
Joined: 01-10-10
aquabunny
In response to scrapchica

American Crafts also makes a pH tester pen.

Anything printed on thermal paper, like receipts and many boarding passes, is toast. Just photocopy it on acid-free paper while you can still read it and don't fuss about the originals.
Products Referenced in This Post:


Edited by aquabunny on 02-12-13 05:20 AM. Reason for edit: No reason given.


 
Vae
Vae 
Diva
Posts: 8826
Joined: 07-14-07
Vae
  • Vae on 02-12-13 06:55 AM
In response to aquabunny

I learned the hard way not to spray the acid free stuff onto those thermal printed plane tickets. oops! LOL. I was trying to preserve the plane ticket stub from when I got engaged to my husband. The whole thing turned black! Now I just make photocopies but still keep the originals too. I've never been able to get the thermal ones to laminate without turning completely black, but I've been curious about the cold laminating.


 
RedSquirrel
Diva
Posts: 5883
Joined: 05-09-09
RedSquirrel
In response to Vae

Laminating only helps to delay any acid leaching through onto other things in the album. It doesn't protect the item inside.

Yes, photocopy anything on thermal paper that you want to keep, like receipts. And keep it out of the sunshine until you can photocopy it. I've had things on windowsills which have faded and browned in just a few days.



 
Henri Jean
Queen
Posts: 28786
Joined: 04-25-09
Henri Jean
In response to RedSquirrel

Good info! I copy anything on thermal or really cheap paper on white acid-free/lignen-free paper. But if I am using originals of something that I can't tell is acid free or not, but is good quality, I do spray the "Make it Acid Free".

As far as preserving things by laminating - I think I heard also that it doesn't protect the item inside. It sure didn't protect my high school diploma!

But there is cold laminating and and hot laminating. Which is supposed to protect papers? If it does work I'd like to try it. My laminator is cold.


 
mj2007 
New Kid On the Block
Posts: 2
Joined: 02-11-13
In response to mrsdriver5

Hi all...thanks a lot for great advice!
Judy thanks for the welcome and it is really exciting and I am having tons of fun going through my son's photos and journaling about them

Henri thanks for the info regarding "make it acid free". I live in Vancouver, Canada and it is quite humid and rainy right through the year so I might have to be careful about what I use on my scrapbooks.

Thanks again everyone...good to be part of a helpful and welcoming community


 
Tenant
Posts: 89
Joined: 02-20-13
In response to mj2007

So if we buy our paper, glue, etc. from JoAnns, hobby Lobby, Michael etc. is all of this scrap booking items acid free? Or should we be buying only from Scrapbook store?


Edited by Homemaid on 02-22-13 01:02 PM. Reason for edit: No reason given.


 
aquabunny
Idol
Posts: 3904
Joined: 01-10-10
aquabunny
In response to Homemaid

No need to panic. Most supplies labeled and sold as scrapbooking products are acid free. If in doubt, check the fine print on the packaging, but generally speaking, if it's been sold in the scrapbooking section of a craft store, it's fine.


 
Tenant
Posts: 89
Joined: 02-20-13
In response to aquabunny

Ok thank you for that.... I guess I am ok then.. Had me worried there for a minute...LOL


 
Henri Jean
Queen
Posts: 28786
Joined: 04-25-09
Henri Jean
In response to Homemaid

I agree with Andrea (Aqua) - I'm very comfortable with products from the scrapbook sections of the big box stores.


 
Permissions Topic Options
1011 Views
Recent Topics