Username Post: Laminating        (Topic#1592305)
justartguy007
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justartguy007

Hi everyone I have a question about laminating old newspaper clippings. I've already laminated most old newspaper clippings. And put some into my scrapbook pages for my heritage album. I used scotch laminating brand. It photo safe and acid free. I had some people say I should use Archival Mist. But I already laminated most of my clippings.

Well they get more yellow or damage even in the laminating protector. Without the archival mist? Or should I try and remove all of them in the laminating protector and archival mist it and then put it back through the laminating process again?


 
stick
stick 
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stick
  • stick on 11-18-13 01:39 PM
In response to justartguy007

I've heard (so you'll want to verify, it may just be a rumor!) that laminating doesn't help. Newspaper is made of the cheapest paper out there and is essentially designed to break down to dust. Plus the paper itself still contains acid, so an archival mist may help but will likely only delay the inevitable. Your best bet would be to copy or photograph the clippings and use that instead - you can even distress and age the copies so they look just like the original, if you want


 
Gelidy Gelato
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Gelidy Gelato
In response to justartguy007

What I have found works best for me, is to scan the newspaper articles and then print them out on either acid free scrapbooking paper in a color that resembles newspaper or on a MATTE photo paper.

Newspaper discolors AND discolors fast! often within 2 years. Acid free sprays may slow the progress down, but it doesn't stop it. Also the discoloration turns into stains and the stains start to leach into surrounding materials.

This is one of those questions, that usually doesn't go well when answered. Because the answer is you really shouldn't scrap newspaper and there is no product or technique to prevent or reverse the damage.

BUT the good news is, it is relatively easy to scan all of the newspaper you have used so far, do a little color correcting in photoshop, print it out and replace it on your pages. I re-did about 30 pages and it only took me a few evenings. If you want more details on how best to do it, send me a IM.


 
justartguy007
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justartguy007
In response to Gelidy Gelato

Thank you both for answering my question. I only have about four or five in my scrapbook. I'll probably take them out and scan them. Most are already scanned. But still have them in a folder.
I've some old newspaper clippings from the 1950s and 1960s through the 80s, 90s and even 2000s holding up well. They have ages turn yellow but are still readable. That why I decided to laminated them. So, they don't get torn or ruin any further.
I have some clippings from 6 and 13 years ago they haven't yellowed at all. So, I guess it depends on the paper quality they use in their newspapers now a days.


 
RedSquirrel
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RedSquirrel
In response to justartguy007

I ought to point out here that the yellowing is not caused by acid, it is the lignin used in the manufacture of the paper. Acid only speeds up the decay process, so no amount of acid-free sprays are going to stop yellowing, I'm afraid.

Laminating will hold it all together and stop the paper from disintegrating completely. But if you want to preserve the content, it's best to scan the article, print it onto acid-free AND lignin-free paper, and scrap that.


 
justartguy007
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Posts: 1224
Joined: 08-05-12
justartguy007
In response to RedSquirrel

Hi Red Squirrel,

thanks for the reply. I've scanned most of my newspaper clippings. I've a few more to laminated and scan. But thanks again.


 
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