Username Post: What is the best professional standard DSLR on the market?        (Topic#1594183)
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Hi, my point and shoot just broke, and I figured I'd take the time to sell off some of my old film cameras and get a DSLR that is as close to a professional as I can get for my money. So I'm wondering what DSLR takes professional level photos, and what is an older model that has 10 megapixels or more that I could get on ebay? If you have examples of what your professional DSLR does, I'd love to see it to be able to compare options. Thanks so much!


 
aubrieannie
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aubrieannie
In response to preraphaelitess

I am a serious hobby photographer so I shoot a LOT. What price range are you looking at? I'm guessing "professional" isn't what you want. If it is, you will spend upwards of $2K for the BODY without a lens. I would guess you are looking for an entry level consumer DSLR. I shoot with Nikon. I started with the D40 (which you can get for a steal used these days because Nikon has since upgraded it a bit). The D40 is a FANTASTIC camera. I shot with it for about five years and still sometimes do shoot with it. I only upgraded when I could tell you what the limitations of the camera were because I noticed them when shooting. But it took me 5 years to notice.

I'd suggest getting an entry level, which is the D40 (or whatever it is now) for Nikon or a Rebel if you are a Canon shooter. A great source for comparisons of canon and Nikon and different cameras is Kenrockwell.com. He has photo examples and everything. I did a LOT of research before buying my D40, and that website was VERY helpful.


 
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In response to aubrieannie

Hi Aubs,

Thank you for your response. I know the professional ones are pricy, but I plan to get mine second hand online. A dinged body and half the current # of megapixels don't bother me. What I'm looking for is a camera that has the best still photo taking ability for my price range, which is small, I grant you, (200-300$ for a body) but since I really don't care that much about great video, or aesthetics I'm hoping I can get an old one for a steal.

I've seen Nikkon D200's for my price range and know that they've got 10.2 megapixels, which is the number I understand you want for stills, but am wondering in terms of photo quality how much better it is than an entry level DSLR. Come to think of it, aside from quality (I'm guessing in the censor, mirrors and lenses?) what is the difference between a professional and an entry level? Will an entry level be just as able to capture great images in low-light scenarios (say of the interiors of the rides at DisneyLand)? Will I have to pay extra for a motor drive to take multiple frames in a single second in an entry level? Are they equally capable of full automation? Equally durable? I'm switching over here from film (in case you can't tell. ;)) and I guess am "framing"(no pun intended) these questions from that point of view. I don't even know if half of these terms still apply anymore.

Anyway, any information would be great. I'd love to be able to takephotography classes and be able to play around with a camera that allowed me to manually as well as automatically adjust the settings, and I don't know if an entry level will let me do that.

But maybe, you're right, maybe I should start off with an entry level and graduate to a professional. I just really want the best photos possible that I can take. They mean so much to me.


Edited by preraphaelitess on 02-17-14 09:17 AM. Reason for edit: No reason given.


 
Jennifer Priest
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Jennifer Priest
In response to preraphaelitess

I recommend the Canon Rebekl T5i. I have the T2i and want to get the T5i. The T2i has been amazing for me!!! And it does video as well

The body isn't as important as the lenses. If you want o upgrade, you can get better lenses and then get a better body if you find you really are into photography. This model runs abotu $600 and you get it on the home shopping type websites on payment plans to make it much easier to stomach


 
aubrieannie
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aubrieannie
In response to Jennifer Priest

I have currently the Nikon d600, which I think is the entry level "professional" camera, and the Nikon d40, which was my entry level consumer DSLR. I can honestly say, I don't think there is a difference in the picture quality at all in normal conditions. My shutterfly page is ALL photos shot with the d40. https://aubswancata.shutterfly.com/ if you want to see what it can do. I do find that the high ISO shooting in low light (ISO = film speed) looks better from my d600 with less interference than with the d40.

My d40 will do continuous shooting, so does the d600. So no need for anything special to make that happen. I think they are equally durable. Both allow for full automation (as well as speed and apeture priority modes). One difference is you have to go through more menus to change options on the d40 than on the d600. But it is not difficult and some of it is still run by its own buttons. The d600 has more points of autofocus, so it is better with quick moving targets.

As for low light, my d600 is indeed, better. The difference though is crop v full frame sensors on the body. Full frame is a larger area, thus more light coming in, thus better in low light conditions. The d600 is the least expensive Nikon with a full frame sensor. A d40, d200, whatever, is still a crop frame. Now, if you throw a decent 50mm prime lense on the crop frame it performs decent in low light. But the d600 outshines it. But even still, I want a bounce flash in low light. Now if you do start with a d200 or other crop sensor and switch up to full frame, you have to replace lenses. The lenses will still work, but because the crop frame lenses were designed for the crop frame cameras, they are only working with the center of your sensor. So they work, but they don't optimize what the camera will do.

Both have hotshoe connections.


 
jaxxan
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jaxxan
In response to aubrieannie

I think Aubs gave some great info so just to add a couple things…..Generally, DSLR will have some kind of manual controls. Just to be sure, I just checked on the Nikon site the entry level DSLR 3100 you have a choice of Aperture priority, shutter priority or manual where you can control both.

Just a word about buying used….I get that you can get a good deal used. However, being that you starting to get into digital cameras, I would buy used from a reputable camera shop that throughly checks out the cameras. Even the most seasoned photographers I know are leery of buying equipment on ebay.

A dent in a film camera may be nothing but aesthetics however in a DSLR it could mean trouble with the sensor or processor.

In addition, some people sell what is considered "grey" market cameras. Those are generally cameras not sold for your country. They might also be a really cheap price brand new from an on-line company. Nikon won't even service them even if its new so if its broken your stuck.

One last thing, all DSLR have only so many shots on the camera, aka actuations. Once the camera gets near that number there will be problems with it. The number sounds huge but if the camera is quite a bit older you could be getting it on the downside. Take my 200 for example, its actuations are 100,000 shots. I hit that mark last year but my shutter was acting up around 75,000 -80,000. No matter how good your lens or the lighting situation you will start to see blur,shake, dark shots etc. its from the shutter breaking down. If you are just learning you may not trust your capabilities enough to realize its the camera and not you.

I say this just to help so you can get the most "bang" for your buck, considering this is not a cheap hobby or profession. Buying used is great just know what you are buying and where it is in its life cycle.














Edited by jaxxan on 02-19-14 02:35 PM. Reason for edit: No reason given.


 
aubrieannie
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aubrieannie
In response to jaxxan

Jaxxan I had no idea about the actuations. Can you get it fixed at that point or do you have to replace? (YIKES)


 
jaxxan
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jaxxan
In response to aubrieannie

It depends on the age and current market value. For the d200 its not worth it. The guy at the shop said just throw it away, but hard to do.

My new camera came yesterday and I am a little disappointed in the body build of it. Its D800e and its way lighter than my 200. After spending that much money, I was a little surprised and disappointed.

How does the 610 feel to you?


 
aubrieannie
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aubrieannie
In response to jaxxan

The D600 feels VERY sturdy, more sturdy than my D40 by far. I think for the price I paid, it would probably be worth replacing my shutter when I get to that point. But glad I know about this now!


 
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In response to aubrieannie

Wow! Thank you so much for the help ladies. Beautiful photos Aubrieannie! What a shutterfly account! The d4o does a lovely job.

And Jaxxan, I had no idea about acuations! It makes sense though, mechanical things that encounter friction will wear out. Just incredibly dissappointing as honestly, I can go through 1,000 shots in a single vacation and a couple hundred when shooting merchandise for my online store. When you consider how many shots you have to take to get that one perfect one, or how many you take o a continual shooting mode, 100,000 shots doesn't seem like a lot. I'll have to check that out. Is there any way to tell on a camera what the actuation is?

And thanks for the warning about e-bay. I am very careful about how I buy on there. A lot of my friends have gotten burned buying electronics there, but there are ways to avoid that.

I'm a little bummed because I was hoping I would be getting a camera for a lifetime. Thosee old film cameras seemed to have longer lives. Oh, well, nothing lasts forever.



 
Mimmy96
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Mimmy96
In response to preraphaelitess

I have the Nikon D5000.. love it and wouldn't trade it! Didn't want to spend a fortune when I bought my first DSLR, I looked at the D3000, but talked to a salesman (that knew about DSLR cameras) and he told me for alittle bit more he would get the D5000. D3000 was a beginners that I would outgrow to soon, and D5000 was intermediate level but at a great price! SOOO Glad I listened to him, I have had mine for about 4 years now and it is perfect for me!


 
rockmom
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In response to Mimmy96

I love my Nikon D5100, if I could do it all over again I go the D7000 series route just for a few more buttons on the body rather than menu-driven buttons. Lenses are far more important than the body. All I have right now are the kit lens and a 55-200 lens. I'd love to have a wide angle, a prime, and a true macro in my kit. Go to YouTube and watch videos of pros giving the cameras you are considering a test drive.


 
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